Our value lies in what we are and what we have been; and not in our ability to create the recent past


I asked my husband; “What did you eat for supper?”

“I haven’t eaten supper yet,” he replied.

BUT – If I had asked; “Did you enjoy the baked salmon this evening?”

He would probably have said; “It as really good. I like it best when you prepare it that way.”

His short term memory was incapable of retaining the information that he had eaten supper, but his long term memory was unable to give details from times gone by when he had taken an interest in the way I cooked. As the disease progressed, he went further and further back in time.

I heard about a patient who longer recognized herself in the mirror, but, she knew that she was the young woman in the snapshot that was shown to her, taken when she was young.

Homer, who suffered from Alzheimer’s disease, said:

Our value lies in what we are and what we have been, and not in our ability to create the recent past.

This entry was posted in Alzheimer's on by .

About Jill

Author of books and articles on support and experiences of living with a mentally ill family member. My aim in blogging is to let others see how a loving family, with a father and husband who is able to give unconditional love, can help the family cope. Many call me the blogging grandma.'

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