Schizophrenia and then Alzheimer’s


Although schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s are very different, while living through schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s, I had to learn that it was not what happened to me that counted, but, how I dealt with each one of them.

i learned that my anger at schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s were destroying me, so, i learned to do something about it. There were times when I felt as if my heart had turned to stone and it was a long time before I gained the ability to laugh, to feel even the tiniest emotion or to be open to loving again.

I had to learn that although pain is inevitable, extended suffering is optional. As there was no way that I could change the  cards that my family had been dealt, I had to learn to change the way I played each hand.

All this took a long time, but eventually, I  learned to take one day at a time. I gained the ability to appreciate a beautiful sunset or, a walk along the shore where I listened to the waves breaking. I even managed to enjoy the experience while wiggling my toes in the damp sand.

One day, I drew up a list of the terrible things that had occurred in my life as opposed to the positive aspects and was surprised to find more entries on the positive side. I am blessed with two wonderful, supportive daughters, five healthy grandchildren whom I adore as well as two helpful sons-in-law. I doubt whether I could have ‘chosen’ two nicer guys for my daughters to marry. How much better can life be  than this?

Charles Swindoll said:

LIFE IS TEN PERCENT WHAT HAPPENS TO YOU AND NINETY PERCENT HOW YOU REACT TO IT.

 

 

 

 

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3 thoughts on “Schizophrenia and then Alzheimer’s

  1. Sara Jacobovici

    Hi Jill,
    I first want to say thank you for all your articles. They are inspiring. I just wanted to comment on this particular article because, I am sure without any intention on your part, there can be a challenge with the concept of the list and your outcome. There are people out there that may not have the same result; more on the positive side. As well, it might just reinforce as sense of lacking or futility. Perhaps a way of encouraging people to look at how they are able to persevere in spite of their life challenges and inspire them to find that one meaningful experience to return to in difficult times, may be an alternative. Thank you for letting me share my thoughts.
    All the best,
    Sara

    Reply

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